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Flash Fiction Anthology— Genre: Urban Arts in partnership with Still Waters Collectives

A group of residents gathered to talk about social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre: Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.
Starting from October 1, 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily, and writers are invited to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/Generational Gap, Privilege, Mental Health, and Gender.
SUBMISSION GUIDELINES:
 
  • Read each comment and submit your flash fiction story based on the social issue addressed in the comment. You can choose from a list of 20 different comments and six social issues posted daily. So, remember to check Genre: Urban Arts every day to see our social issue comment post for the day.
  • Your flash fiction story should have a beginning, a middle, and an end.
  • It should include conflict or an incident which creates some conflict for your character(s).
  • The ending of your story should show readers that the incident or conflict, which happened to your character(s), affected or changed your character(s) world or worldview.
  • We are accepting original unpublished work for this flash fiction anthology.
  • Word count is 1000 or less.
  • All flash fiction submissions should be in Microsoft Word doc. or .docx formats.
  • Submission Deadline: November 20, 2018.
  • Submit your story to us on Submittable.
Flash Fiction

 

Project Editors Mercy Ananeh-Frempong and Ralvell Rogers II.

 

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No. 5 GUA Print

Cop a copy of Genre: Urban Arts No. 5 Print that will begin being shipped out on September 24th. We have a host of contemporary visual art and writing that needs to be in your hands. Our cover artist for No. 5 is Nadine Mbaka. Read more about her in an article written by Vianca Fuster.

We are a small print magazine. Copies are limited. Purchase your copy now!

 

Genre: Urban Arts No. 5 Print


Continue reading No. 5 GUA Print

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Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration for your flash fiction story.

Social Issue of the Day: MENTAL HEALTH

Comment of the Day:

“Depression is real, a lot of people suffer with that, sometimes people you don’t even realize. To me, holding in your emotions and not expressing yourself – not being able to talk to people, it causes so many other problems.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Thirteen

a poem by Jaleesa Davis

Still, after seven years, I can’t say that my heart still feels no pain, before that day it was sunshine and afterward it was just rain.

No one ever told me my story wouldn’t be goofy or fun, and as far as stories are concerned, I wish I didn’t have one.

They say you always have a choice in life, that is until someone takes that right from you leaving you with only the choice they make, the one thing I thought I was able to give who knew you’d take.

I told you I forgave you because I did, but I still cry about it and I still mourn over it because I was just a kid.

And maybe I never used word of mouth to say no or that I didn’t want to continue with the actions being introduced, but I can tell you right now that I wasn’t seduced, and that I shouldn’t have been with you.

I’ll always blame myself for what happened to me because what good would it do if I continued to blame you, I’d still be unhappy.

It’s been seven years since you took the one thing I was allowed to give, and sometimes I wonder how I live with that memory in the back of my brain, there is sunshine and yet there’s still rain.

I’ll never yell that dirty R word because I know it’s not real, and that’s not what it was, but I’ll always loathe you because it was supposed to be my choice and it never was.

You were an adult and I wish I could tell you that I am now too, and yet I still sometimes think about you.

I’ve repressed that day so much in my mind. It feels like it’s been loads of time, between then and now, and it still affects me and I don’t know how.

 

published in Genre: Urban Arts First Edition

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Submit your flash fiction story based on today’s social issue comment

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Social Issue of the Day: GENDER

Comment of the Day:

“It’s important for men to express their feelings. They’re taught to be tough, and it’s really unfortunate. They get into relationships and don’t feel like they can ever take their guard down, and that’s pretty unfortunate.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Muslim Bomber

by Roomana Shaikh 

Laila hated Saturdays. She hated going to Queens and having to transfer three different trains. She hated every aspect of the travel. She hated having to wear the long black abaya that flowed and also brought a lot of attention. She hated the cream white hijab she had to wear with it and how it had to be pinned all the way,  and wrapped around her monstrous curls. More than anything Laila hated coming back. She hated the anxiety she had when coming back from Queens. She tried to find any way to avoid the kids at her block, avoid any of the kids around her school. All the Muslim kids had heard she wore the abaya but no one really saw her.  Today seemed different though. As she walked down the steps with her mom, she noticed how crowded the streets were. The weather was getting warmer which meant more people, which meant people she knew, which meant her secret was about to be spilled. The sucky thing was that either way she went back to her house, she was going to be seen.

“Beta, remember to be confident. Look the sun is shining but I’m not hot. I know people bother with these questions, but you need to speak up.” Her mom said as they walked down the sidewalk. This was going to be a weekly lecture. Laila’s mom wore an all-black abaya and hijab. She had her mouth covered as well, so the only thing you could see was her large brown eyes peeking through.

“Ammi I know. I get it. But wearing all black isn’t fun either. We look like the people on tv. Look at us. Why do you think that guy was yelling at us on the train? We do look weird!” Laila argued back. She hated the abaya. It made her feel so out of place. Most of all it reminded her of how un-American she was.

“So what?! This dress should be just as acceptable as jeans and a t-shirt. Who cares if someone thinks we look like criminals.  We’re educated, civilized  people.  You need to accept that.

The more you listen to the ignorance, the more you’re going to lose your roots. Look at me?! My own people mock me for covering up. But I don’t care. I believe in my religion and I believe in my choices. Your own father is against my niqab. Beta you need to be brave. I was so brave then and I still am.” She replied in a much harsher tone. When Laila’s mom spoke, it sounded like thunder yelling from the sky. Even though the strangers passing by didn’t understand what she was saying, they knew it was something important.

“Well, I can’t be brave. Everyone bullies me. Everyone mocks me. No one wants to be my friend.” Laila complained. Oh, how she wished she was like her mom. Oh, how she wished her mom understood her.

“YOOO LAILA?! YO you look the Taliban! Your mom- ma’s a ninja bro. Salam ninja. Got any bombs under there.” Yelled Daniel and Ryan. They stood on the bench- es hollering at Laila and her mom as they walked by. She noticed Tommy in the back just laughing.

“See, now speak up Laila. I know how you feel” Laila’s mom said. She started walking towards the boys. Laila wanted to hide and cry. Her secret was exposed. It was over. It was all over. She wanted to burn her clothes. She wanted to leave her mom.

“Yes yes, I’m a ninja! But you are rude! This is my culture. This is my religion. How dare you say I have bombs with me? Have some shame!” Her mom yelled at the three boys. They stood quietly and then started to snicker. Laila’s mom turned and started walking towards her building. In front of the building were all the aunties just staring at her astonishingly. Laila saw Mohammed and Ali stare as well, stopping their basketball game below the fire escape. Laila felt her cheeks getting hot and red. Her hands trembled and she just wanted to hide.

 

first published in June 2017 in Genre: Urban Arts

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Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration for your flash fiction story.

Social Issue of the Day: PRIVILEGE

Comment of the Day:

“When we’re on the phone, we don’t see color. I’m brown. When I’m on the phone, people think I’m white. They’re not rude when they see me, but they’re clearly disappointed. I saw a meme recently that read: “Life is great if you sound Caucasian on the phone.””

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Submit your flash fiction story based on today’s social issue comment

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Social Issue of the Day: GENERATIONS/GENERATIONAL GAP

Comment of the Day:

“Where’s our power? We can start redefining what success is supposed to look like. My father didn’t respect my work because I didn’t go to college and don’t have a downtown kind of job. When he saw me interviewed on TV for my impact on the community, he finally got it. But it took someone else to make my success valid. My uncles only want to know why I’m not married.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration for your flash fiction story.

Social Issue of the Day: INTERSECTIONALITY

Comment of the Day:

“There was someone who was talking about being the only one of her co-workers that represented multiple groups (gender, race, age) and how hard she had to fight to be taken seriously. That sat with me because I’m in a field of science where women are kind of new to it and slightly underrepresented. She’s acknowledged for her skills but not all of the pieces of who she is.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

Posted on

Submit Your Flash Fiction Story Based on Today’s Social Issue Comment

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Social Issue of the Day: PRIVILEGE

Comment of the Day:

“I feel sorry for blacks. Society is going backwards and taking them with it.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

 

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Deep Pockets

Image via @photosbyelldot_ (unsplash.com)

 

There comes a time in every girl-turned-woman’s life where promiscuity is a thing that simply must be had.  Looking for the outside to match the inside. Trying to ingest this idea of attaching monetary value to things passionate.  Things gifted.  Things anointed.  Deep pockets are, after all, the world’s oldest profession.  Yes, there comes a time in every girl-turned-woman’s life where all she knows is to turn away…or…invite you in.

And ask, “do I still feel the same?”

And think, “I bet he thinks this song (and dance) is about him.”

Careful, how you pro seed.

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Femme: Literati Mixtape

So, yeah!  With all the unseen words

floating around in clouds

and free spaces

and unwired four walls

real paper, pages, ink has become somewhat obsolete

and needed a Native Queen to bring them back to life.

And HERstory was made!  ‘cause isn’t this how it’s always made?  

Look around.  It’s happening!

Femme: Literati Mixtape is an anthology due Summer 2019 conceived by Genre: Urban Arts.  Anthologies are everything!  Literally…everything!  Creative Director, Nakeysha Roberts Washington (@nakeysha) together with authors/editors Rico Lowe (@panafrico) and Shimah Easter (@gonbeallwrite_mah) are preparing to present this opportunity to women creatives who are of the African diaspora together with their brown sistren, contemporary, informed and passionate.  The anthology will feature a mix of written word, art, photography and fashion. If you are interested in this opportunity or know an artist who would be, please DM/contact any of the editors above or visit the ‘Opportunities’ tab at genreurbanarts.com. We are HERstory in the making!

Here’s the fatbooty on what we are looking for…

  • Fiction or Creative Nonfiction
    • 500 words or less
  • Poetry
    • 2-4 poems with 50 lines or less
  • Prose
    • 500 words or less
  • Art
    • Title, Medium
    • 1-3 images (file size no greater than 64MB)
    • Artist statement
  • Photography
    • Title, Medium
    • 5-7 images (file size no greater than 64MB)
    • Artist statement
  • Fashion
    • Bloggers, models and designers with impeccable style who want to call attention to his or her work. You are welcome to compose a write up on yourself; however, Genre editors would be happy to interview you and compose one for you.
    • 5-7 Images (file size no greater than 64MB)
    • 200-400 words
Femme Literati: Mixtape