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Check out Author Astrid Ferg TODAY

Astrid Ferguson is the momma of the book Molt and The Serpent’s Rattle. An emerging poet, blogger, part-time writer, mother of two boys, wife to an emerging Philly artist, novice photographer, major foodie, professional dancer (in her mind), and a lover of all things creative. Astrid is an Afro-Latina (Haitian and Dominican descent) born in the Dominican Republic. She migrated to the United States at the early age of one. A passion for poetry developed after Astrid dealt with childhood hardships and abuse. She has been involved in several spoken word events and has been published in several literary magazines such as Genre Urban Arts, Harness Magazine, Visual Verse, and Literary Orphans to name a few.

Support the Writer’s work.

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Atlantic Theater Company presents FIREFLIES by Donja R. Love

Now Until Sunday, November 11th!

Atlantic Theater

Linda Gross Theater, 336 West 20th Street

Runtime: Approximately 90 minutes without an intermission

The New York Times calls Fireflies “rich and fascinating,” with “exhilarating” performances!

Don’t miss your chance to see this fierce, imaginative love story by Donja R. Love, directed by Saheem Ali, now through November 11th only at the Atlantic Theater in NYC.

Use special code WICG25 for $25 tickets after you clicking the button below:

 

Fireflies

 

 

“UNEARTHING THE ROLE OF GAY BLACK PEOPLE IN AMERICAN HISTORY IS A CRUCIAL PROPOSITION. I WAS MOVED BY MR. LOVE’S WILLINGNESS TO IMAGINE OTHER KINDS OF LIVES THAN THE ONES THAT HISTORY BOOKS OFFER! EMBODIED BY THE FINE PERFORMERS HERE, THOSE LIVES REALLY DO SEEM ALIVE. KHRIS DAVIS IS EXHILARATING & HEARTBREAKING. THE LANGUAGE IS RICH & FASCINATING.”
— Jesse Green, The New York Times

“DEWANDA WISE GIVES AN ELECTRICALLY CHARGED PERFORMANCE. HER BODY CONTAINS A WHOLE HISTORY OF LIFE BEFORE WALLS, BEFORE CAGES, BEFORE DEPENDENCE. THIS IS LANGUAGE AS LUSH CATHARSIS, LANGUAGE AS EMPOWERMENT. IT FEELS LIKE GOING TO CHURCH.

— Sara Holdren, New York Magazine

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Finding Forever

a segmented memoir by Nakeysha D Roberts Washington

 

Baby, you understand me now
If sometimes you see that I’m mad
No one can always be an angel
When everything goes wrong you see some bad
Well I’m just a soul whose intentions are good
Oh Lord, please don’t let me be misunderstood 

I met George by my grandma house when I was in seventh grade. He lived in the Parklawn, projects around the corner. He was a deep, dark brown. His eyes and his hair were the blackest black. He was just few inches taller than me. We quickly became very good friends. He was funny and sincere and I could depend on him.

Continue reading Finding Forever

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Kissed by Growth’s Pain

a poem by Shaunteri Skinner

she fell into the burns of her past as they lay thick & thin

on her brain,

the emptiness was so full,

it was so well-rounded & welcoming.

kissed by growth’s pain in too many ways to describe how she

could bear to breathe,

ignoring the calms of eves or news of life’s chances in whatever direction.

she felt as if her waking was

misbehavior until she woke out of that dream of killers that she kept  repeating At night,

those who laughed right next to her with blood all over their hands

causing blood to be her brain ever so often.

until all of the flesh fell back onto her

bones,

the rest of her left the world, never want-

ing to have gone,

but never wanting to come back either.

being trapped in her

life & the life that history

made for her caused all of

the pain that she would

ever need to grow,

to be Black, woman &

beautiful was the best that she

ever had to be,

But proving it to those

who mattered most

Seemed like new & old crushed dreams.

published in Genre: Urban Arts First Edition

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Submit your flash fiction story based on today’s social issue comment

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Social Issue of the Day: GENDER

Comment of the Day:

“He was murdered by his girlfriend, but we don’t call him a victim of domestic violence. Had he ever considered seeking help –not that we encourage men to do that– where could he have gone?”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration for your flash fiction story.

Social Issue of the Day: GENERATIONS/GENERATIONAL GAP

Comment of the Day:

“My parents are more religious than I am.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Submit your flash fiction story based on today’s social issue comment

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Social Issue of the Day: PRIVILEGE

Comment of the Day:

“Privilege is such an unconscious thing.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration for your flash fiction story.

Social Issue of the Day: GENERATIONS/GENERATIONAL GAP

Comment of the Day:

“Children are being taught less and less history. Today, a student can name only Rosa Parks (who was not the first to refuse her seat, it was a 13-year-old girl) and MLK Jr. A good student will name Malcolm X, and a star student will name Thurgood Marshall. Also, history books are changing.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Survival Skills

by Yetunde Bronson

I had a pretty disturbing revelation the other day: should this world as we all know it comes to a loud and violent end, and we are all left to fend for ourselves, without infrastructure or order, I would be dead within a few days because I have, like, zero survival skills.

This is the type of shit I think about late at night, Fam. Bear with me.

Seriously – I sat up one night and wrote down a list of my skills that could possibly come in handy should the eternal nightfall on our world.

Here’s what I came up with:

  • Whistling: Perhaps I could serve as a lookout for a roving band of thieves. Except I’m blind as a bat without my glasses, so…
  • Dancing: I’m thinking like in that setup Tina Turner had in Beyond the Thunderdome. Probably not likely, though.
  • Cook: Which is fine if someone has a working stove. Otherwise, I’m useless cuz I don’t know how to start a fire without matches.

I mean, outside of these, I have other, impressive skills that would be rendered utterly useless after the collapse of civilization. This really disturbed me, so I decided to do something about it – I went out and bought some seeds.

For some reason, I decided that out of all of the useful, post-apocalyptic survival skills, gardening would make the most sense for me. It sounded easy enough. I mean, ignore the fact that I have killed 80% of the plant life I have ever touched – a statistic that has been documented by my own mother, who, upon hearing my plans to start a balcony garden, leaned against the wall, weak with laughter. Keep in mind, my mother is horticulturally blessed by the Ancestors and the Holy Ghost. I have seen her cup a dead (not dying, Fam – dead) plant in her hand, blow on it and watch it shudder back to life. The shit is mind-boggling. So, yeah. I was in my chest when she laughed at me.

      “Well, everybody can’t be out here in these streets, resurrecting aloe vera plants and what not,” I said (in my head).

      Anyway, I brushed that off and got some seeds. And yeah, I made some mistakes with some of them –  planted them too early, watered them too little, crowded too many in the pot.

      But I learned. I asked around – co-workers, the exhausted but helpful woman at Stein’s Gardening Center, the nurse at the ER who apparently owns her own farm.

And I tried again. And now, I am seeing the fruits, or vegetables, of my labor.

So, when the zombie apocalypse begins,  and you find yourself in the Midwest, come holler at me. I’ll be the dreadlocked sister in the fatigues, trading tomatoes out of a truck.

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Submit your flash fiction story based on today’s social issue comment

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Social Issue of the Day: INCARCERATION

Comment of the Day:

“It’s an economic situation. If you think about the prison pipeline, the school-to-prison pipeline, all those type of things – at the end of the day, poverty and crime PAYS.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Mistaken Wisdom

a poem byCaroline Fleurette

Endless nights spent sitting on my mother’s lap

A tug of war of ideologies

As she straightens my perspective

One must be presentable for every situation

She mused

Yet, the next day I wouldn’t want to go to school

Because when I look in the mirror I’m not the reflection

of my Barbie

The results of my mother efforts vaporizes at the finger

pointing

And snickers of my classmates

Stick to your roots she encourages

I don’t think she truly understands

How can I stay true to myself

When weekly I face my tangled insecurities

Do you know you were the worst role model for me You

look nothing like me

Your strands has a mind of its own

Speaking freely with the wind

But in the end I internalized my thoughts

Weekly during the…

Endless night spent sitting on my mother’s lap

 

published in Genre: Urban Arts’ First Edition

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Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration for your flash fiction story.

Social Issue of the Day: MENTAL HEALTH

Comment of the Day:

“Depression is real, a lot of people suffer with that, sometimes people you don’t even realize. To me, holding in your emotions and not expressing yourself – not being able to talk to people, it causes so many other problems.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.

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Thirteen

a poem by Jaleesa Davis

Still, after seven years, I can’t say that my heart still feels no pain, before that day it was sunshine and afterward it was just rain.

No one ever told me my story wouldn’t be goofy or fun, and as far as stories are concerned, I wish I didn’t have one.

They say you always have a choice in life, that is until someone takes that right from you leaving you with only the choice they make, the one thing I thought I was able to give who knew you’d take.

I told you I forgave you because I did, but I still cry about it and I still mourn over it because I was just a kid.

And maybe I never used word of mouth to say no or that I didn’t want to continue with the actions being introduced, but I can tell you right now that I wasn’t seduced, and that I shouldn’t have been with you.

I’ll always blame myself for what happened to me because what good would it do if I continued to blame you, I’d still be unhappy.

It’s been seven years since you took the one thing I was allowed to give, and sometimes I wonder how I live with that memory in the back of my brain, there is sunshine and yet there’s still rain.

I’ll never yell that dirty R word because I know it’s not real, and that’s not what it was, but I’ll always loathe you because it was supposed to be my choice and it never was.

You were an adult and I wish I could tell you that I am now too, and yet I still sometimes think about you.

I’ve repressed that day so much in my mind. It feels like it’s been loads of time, between then and now, and it still affects me and I don’t know how.

 

published in Genre: Urban Arts First Edition

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Submit your flash fiction story based on today’s social issue comment

Be part of our upcoming flash fiction anthology! Tell us a story in 1000 words or less. Use today’s social issue comment as inspiration.

Social Issue of the Day: GENDER

Comment of the Day:

“It’s important for men to express their feelings. They’re taught to be tough, and it’s really unfortunate. They get into relationships and don’t feel like they can ever take their guard down, and that’s pretty unfortunate.”

Background information for this project

A group of residents gathered to discuss social issues affecting their lives and their communities. This was part of an experimental social conversations project and pop-up survey called Soapbox, organized by Still Waters Collective. From these discussions, Genre Urban Arts is partnering with Still Waters Collective to invite all writers to submit flash fiction for an upcoming anthology.

Starting from 1st October 2018, we will share one anonymous response/comment on a social issue daily. We invite writers to submit flash fiction pieces based on the social issue addressed in the comment. The comments we will use to inspire flash fiction stories will cover issues such as Intersectionality, Incarceration, Generations/ Generational gap, Privilege, Mental Health, Sexuality, and Gender.

Twenty different comments will be shared throughout October and November 2018. So, remember to follow Genre: Urban Arts on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook to see our social issue comment post for the day.

To participate, read the SUBMISSION GUIDELINES and tap the Flash Fiction Button to send us your story.